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Archive for the ‘Key West Museums’ Category

Hometown Pass

April 7th, 2018 by Piper Smith

Key West Residents that sign up for Read the rest of this entry »

Locals Day

March 4th, 2018 by Piper Smith

Calling all Locals! Every FIRST SUNDAY of the month is FREE for Monroe County residents! Come on down to the Key West Shipwreck Museum for a tour!

 

*Proof of residency required

Hometown Pass

March 3rd, 2018 by Piper Smith

Key West Residents that sign up for Read the rest of this entry »

Hometown Pass

February 4th, 2018 by Piper Smith

Calling all Locals! Every FIRST SUNDAY of the month is FREE for Monroe County residents! Come on down to the Key West Shipwreck Museum for a tour!

 

*Proof of residency required

Hometown Pass

February 3rd, 2018 by Piper Smith

Key West Residents that sign up for Read the rest of this entry »

Locals Day

January 7th, 2018 by Piper Smith

Calling all Locals! Every FIRST SUNDAY of the month is FREE for Monroe County residents! Come on down to the Key West Shipwreck Museum for a tour!

 

*Proof of residency required

Hometown Pass

January 6th, 2018 by Piper Smith

Key West Residents that sign up for Read the rest of this entry »

Widows Walk

October 24th, 2017 by Piper Smith

A widow’s walk is also known as a Widow’s Watch. It is a small railed rooftop platform frequently found on 19th-century North American coastal houses. They are a common sight to see on Original Conch Houses built during the Wrecking Era.

Some properties in Key West with a widow’s walk include:

The Curry Mansion, Sarabeth’s, John Lowe Jr. House, Island City House.

Replica Doll House of the Lowe House on Southard St.

Asa Tift

August 22nd, 2017 by Piper Smith

Asa Tift was the elder son of Captain Amos Tift, one of the Read the rest of this entry »

6 Undiscovered Wrecks

July 18th, 2017 by Piper Smith

Is it possible to know of wrecks that have yet to be discovered? How do we track that?

Today, we have GPS technology where locating sinking (and floating) ships is easier to locate. As recent as the early 1900’s Ships have sunk and are yet to be found. Because of currents and drifts in the ocean it is difficult to pinpoint an exact location without the use of today’s technology.

The locations known of these sunken ships is a “guestimation” of their course of travel and where they submerged into the water.

Six wrecks that embody this situation are the Santa Maria 1492), USS Indianapolis (1945), HMS Endeavour (1778), The Griffin (1679), Shackleton’s Endurance (1914), Bonhomme Richard (1779).

 

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